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Computer Science


Head of Faculty – Mr J Parker (jparker@nationalce-ac.org.uk)
Computing teachers – Mr Lee, Mr Gilham and Mr Mistry

KS4

GCSE

The GCSE equips students with the necessary skills to solve complex problems by applying relevant aspects of computational thinking. They will understand how various data are represented inside a computer system as well as developing an understanding of how hardware and software are applied in a range of computer controlled situations. They will develop their understanding of computer networks and security as well as gaining an understanding of the technologies used for data transmission on the Internet. Students will develop software for a range of uses and apply their understanding of algorithms; they will gain an appreciation of how problems are broken down into sub-problems and how computational methods can be employed to create robust and well tested software. They will be assessed by an examination at the end of Year 11, which accounts for 75 per cent of the qualification and, at the beginning of Year 11, they will undertake a programming project which is worth the remaining 25 per cent.

 

 

KS5

The A-Level in Computer Science equips pupils with the necessary skills to solve complex computational problems by applying computational thinking such as the development of algorithms, abstraction and problem decomposition.  They will understand that some problems cannot be solved computationally and may lend themselves to heuristic approaches.  Pupils will develop an understanding of the underlying technologies which enable computation such as the function and architecture of modern computer processors.  Many aspects of Computer Science can be explained using mathematical principles, therefore, pupils learn the mathematical and logical concepts which underlie the discipline of Computer Science.  The course is split into three components: computer systemsis tested by means of an examination worth 40% as is the other unit, programming and problem solving.  In Year 13, pupils undertake a substantial programming project of their own choosing which is worth the remaining 20% of the course.